Need Assistance? 01384 442752 (UK)

PROFICIENCY AWARD IN ECOTOURISM BTR103

Duration (approx) 500 hours
Qualification Proficiency Award

Combine ecotourism theory and knowledge with practical work placements with this 500 hour course.

 Develop your ability to establish, operate and manage an ecotourism enterprise and increase your knowledge in all aspects of running such a venture; through studies covering management of issues such as safety, legal considerations, destinations, accommodation, and management issues, planning, organising and conducting ecotourism services (such as guiding and tours). This is awarded upon completion of: a) Three Ecotourism courses and b) A workplace project or work experience (approved by a tutor and equal to 200 hours)

Courses can be started anytime from anywhere in the world!

towergatelogo.jpg PROFESSIONAL LIABILITY INSURANCE FOR ACS GRADUATES
Towergate Insurance welcomes Professional Liability insurance applications from ACS graduates across all disciplines. Click here for more details.
 

It's easy to enrol...

1
Select a payment plan:  


2
Select a learning method  

3
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT COURSE

 

Study eco-tour management, bushcraft and wilderness skills, tour guiding in ecotourism in this distance learning course.
 
The course requires the completion of three 100 hour modules - Eco-tour Management, Ecotourism Tour Guide and Bushcraft and Wilderness Skills and evidence of a 200 hour work placement/work experience.

COURSE CONTENT

This is awarded upon completion of:
 
a) Three Ecotourism courses (300 hours)

b) A workplace project or work experience (approved by a tutor and equal to 200 hours)

More information is given below on the three modules and the workplace experience/placement.


ECOTOUR MANAGEMENT

There are 9 lessons as follows:

  1. Nature and Scope of Ecotourism -
    • Definition of ecotourism
    • Negative ecotourism
    • Principles of ecotourism
  2. Management Issues -
    • Recreation and the environment
    • recreational impacts on the environment
    • ethical and legal concerns
    • code of practice for ecotourism operators
    • incorporating ecotourism principles into activities
    • interpretation
    • visitor guidelines
    • planning for minimal impact
    • quality control
  3. Industry Destinations -
    • The ecotourism market
    • what do ecotourists want?
    • trends in international tourism
    • understanding the needs of the consumer
    • consumer expectations
  4. The Tour Desk/Office -
    • Office procedures
    • providing information
    • employment prospects in ecotourism
    • bookings
    • business letters
    • telephone manner
  5. Accommodation Facilities -
    • Types of accommodation facilities
    • layout of facilities
  6. Catering Facilities -
    • Introduction to catering
    • accepted practice for service facilities
    • storing and preserving food
  7. Legal Considerations -
    • National Parks
    • land use/planning restrictions
    • code of practice
  8. Safety-
    • The safety strategy
    • hazards
    • first aid
  9. Planning an Ecotourism Activity -
    A special project where the student plans out an ecotourism activity including:
    • budget
    • accommodation
    • licenses
    • meals
    • destination

Each lesson culminates in an assignment which is submitted to the school, marked by the school's tutors and returned to you with any relevant suggestions, comments, and if necessary, extra reading.

AIMS

  • Describe the scope of ecotourism experiences available.
  • Determine management issues related to ecotourism activities/enterprises, giving due consideration to environmental and ethical concerns.
  • Develop in the learner an awareness of ecotourism destinations in existence and possibilities (in the learner's country).
  • Explain the management and operation of an ecotourism office.
  • Explain the management of ecotourist accommodation facilities including:
    • camp sites
    • cabins
    • caravans
    • resorts
  • Identify catering options for different ecotourism activities.
  • Identify legal and statutory requirements for the establishment and operation of an ecotourism enterprise.
  • Identify/establish safety precautions/requirements/procedures for an ecotourism enterprise.
  • Plan for an ecotourism activity.

 

Comment from one of our Ecotourism students:
"I am learning so much" J. Alderton

 


BUSHCRAFT & WILDERNESS ACTIVITIES

COURSE STRUCTURE
There are 10 lessons as follows:

  1. Understanding Wilderness Areas
  2. Equipment
  3. Protection from the Elements
  4. Natural Resources
  5. Navigation
  6. Dealing with Emergencies
  7. Camping
  8. Passive Land Based Activities
  9. Water Based Adventure Activities
  10. Active Land Based Adventure Activites

AIMS

  • To appreciate the scope and implications of ecotourism opportunities in wilderness areas.
  • To be able to prepare for an excursion into a wilderness area
  • To determine appropriate methods of protecting against the elements.
  • To determine different uses for natural resources in the wilderness.
  • To be able to navigate in a wilderness area using a variety of different techniques.
  • To deal with a range of emergencies in a wilderness situation, including developing contingency plans and determining appropriate first aid.
  • Explain campsite establishment and management.
  • Determine appropriate procedures for managing different passive wilderness activities.
  • Determine appropriate procedures for managing different water based wilderness activities.
  • Determine appropriate procedures for managing different active wilderness activities.

 

ECOTOURISM TOUR GUIDE

COURSE STRUCTURE
There are 10 lessons as follows:

  1. Ecotourism Basics –
    • Definition of ecotourism
    • Negative ecotourism
    • Ecotourist profile
    • Administrative concerns
    • Safety
  2. Interpretive Services in Ecotourism –
    • Interpretation as a key element of ecotourism
    • Interpretation techniques
    • Sign design
  3. Ecology and Conservation –
    • Definition of ecology
    • Ecosystem function
    • The web of life
    • Habitat and niche
    • Humans in the environment
  4. Plant and Animal Classification and Identification –
    • Classification of organisms
    • Basic taxonomy
    • Using keys for identification
    • Other methods of identification
  5. Geology/Geomorphology –
    • Types of rocks
    • Types of minerals
    • Soils
    • Soil formation
    • Soil classification
  6. Interpreting Aquatic Environments –
    • Marine environments
    • Freshwater environments
    • Fish
    • Shells
    • Crustaceans
  7. Interpreting Land Environments –
    • Introduction to interpreting land environments
    • Relevance of interpreting land environments
  8. Planning an Ecotour –
    • Destination
    • Transportation
    • Accommodation
  9. Ecotour Displays –
    • Design concepts
    • Zoo design techniques
  10. Leading an Ecotour –
    • Advertising
    • Group preparation
    • Planning the tour
    • Group surveys for feedback

AIMS

  • An ability to analyse the structure of interpretive ecotourism in your country.
  • To recognise factors of the environment and their significance to ecotourism.
  • To plan an ecotour.
  • Create/develop interpretation aids for a selected ecotourism activity.
  • Develop a display with an ecotourism theme.
  • Determine the specific name of a range of natural features in a selected wilderness area including:
    • Birds
    • Fish
    • Shells
    • Other animals
    • Plants
  • Lead an interpretive tour with an ecotourism theme.
  • Develop innovative concepts in interpretation for a selected aquatic ecotourism activity.
  • Develop innovative concepts in interpretation for a selected ecotourism activity in a land environment.
  • Determine the specific name of a range of natural features in a selected wilderness area including, where appropriate:
    • Fossils
    • Rocks
    • Land formations
    • Soil types
  • Geothermal features

 

Workplace Projects

There are four options available to you to satisfy this requirement:

Alternative 1.

If you work in the industry that you have been studying; you may submit a reference from your employer, in an effort to satisfy this industry (ie. workplace project) requirement; on the basis of RPL (ie. recognition for prior learning), achieved through your current and past work experience.

The reference must indicate that you have skills and an awareness of your industry, which is sufficient for you to work in a position of responsibility.

Alternative 2.

A one module credit (100 hrs) can be achieved by verifying attendance at a series of industry meetings, as follows:

  • Meetings may be seminars, conferences, trade shows, committee meetings, volunteer events (eg. Community working bees), or any other meeting where two or more industry people or people who are knowledgeable about their discipline.
  • Opportunity must exist for the student to learn through networking, observation and/or interaction with people who know their industry or discipline
  • A list of events should be submitted together with dates of each attended and times being claimed for each
  • Documentary evidence must be submitted to the school to indicate support each item on the above list (eg. Receipts from seminars, conference or shows, letters from committee or organisation secretaries or committee members. All such documentation must contain a contact details)

Alternative 3.

Credits can be achieved by completing standard modules Workshop I, II and/or III

Each of these modules comprises a series of “hands on” PBL projects, designed as learning experiences that involve interaction with the real world. (This approach is based upon tried and proven learning approaches that originated in American universities but are now widely used and respected by academia throughout many countries). See the web site or handbook for more detail.

Example:

Workshop I

There are 3 lessons, each involving a PBL project, as follows:

1. Workplace Tools, Equipment and Materials: Identifying and describing the operation of tools and equipment used in the workplace; routine maintenance of tools and equipment; identifying and comparing materials used in the workplace; using different materials to perform workplace tasks.

2. Workplace Skills: Determining key practical skills in the workplace; identifying and comparing commonly-performed workplace tasks; determining acceptable standards for workplace tasks; implementing techniques for improving workplace efficiency.

3. Workplace Safety: Identifying health and safety risks in the workplace; complying with industry OH&S standards; developing safety guidelines for handling dangerous items.

What is PBL? Problem-based learning has been defined as: “A learning method based on using problems as a starting point for acquisition and integration of new knowledge.”

Alternative 4.

If you do not work in the relevant industry, you need to undertake a project as follows.

Procedure for a Workplace Project

This project is a major part of the course involving the number of hours relevant to the course (see above). Although the course does not contain mandatory work requirements, work experience is seen as highly desirable.

This project is based on applications in the work place and specifically aims to provide the student with the opportunity to apply and integrate skills and knowledge developed through various areas of formal study.

Students will design this project in consultation with a tutor to involve industry based activities in the area of specialized study which they select to follow in the course. The project outcomes may take the form of a written report, folio, visuals or a mixture of forms. Participants with relevant, current or past work experience will be given exemption from this project if they can provide suitable references from employers that show they have already fulfilled the requirements of this project.

For courses that involve more than 100 hours, more than one workplace project topic may be selected. For example, 200 hours may be split into two projects each of 100 hours. This will offer the student better scope to fulfill the needs of their course and to meet the number of hours required. Alternatively, the student may wish to do one large project with a duration of 200 hours.

Students will be assessed on how well they achieve the goals and outcomes they originally set as part of their negotiations with their tutor. During each 100 hours of the project, the students will present three short progress reports. These progress reports will be taken into account when evaluating the final submission. The tutor must be satisfied that the work submitted is original.

If the student wishes to do one large 200 hour report, then only three progressive reports will be needed (however the length of each report will be longer).

 

 

 

WHAT NEXT?

Register to Study -Go to panel toward top of this page (right column)

or

Get Advice -Use our FREE COUNSELLING SERVICE to contact a tutor

CLICK TO CONTACT US

 

 

 

Meet some of our academics

Dr Karen CrippsTwo decades in tourism, as an educator, researcher and writer. Her experience also extends to environmental management, ecotourism and business management. PhD, M.Sc, BA (Hons) TEASOL
Dr Robert Browne (Environmental)Robert has an outstanding international reputation in Conservation, Environmental Management and Animal Science, having extensive experience across Europe, Australia, North America and central America. He has decades of experience working across subjects ranging from biodiversity and Wetland Ecology to Reptile Ecology and Animal Breeding. Zoologist, Environmental. He holds a B.Sc.(Hons) from the University of Tasmania and a Ph.D. from the University of Newcastle. In recent years he has worked with Ghent University in the Netherlands, Antwerp University in Belgium, Perth Zoo in Australia and on a major sustainability project in Belize. Robert is a widely published research scientist and a referee for more than a dozen internationally renowned scientific journals. Robert brings a very comprehensive a unique experience to the school and provides our students an opportunity to learn from one of the worlds leading environmental and wildlife scientists.
Barbara Seguel B.Sc. M.Sc.Agricultural science graduate, biologist, marine scientist, aquaculturist and educator. Barbara has worked on farms, in ecotourism, education and publishing. She is widely travelled, having been educated in both California and Chile; and having worked in Hawaii, Mexico, Chile, New Zealand, and Australia.
Dr. Gareth PearceGraduated from the University of Nottingham in 1982 with a B.Sc.(Hons) in Animal Science. Between 82 and 85 worked as Research Assistant and Demonstator in Animal Science at the University of Leeds. Over more than 30 years he has furthered his studies, obtaining eight significant university qualifications including degrees in Veterinary Science, Wildlife Conservation and Animal Behaviour. Gareth has significant teaching experience around the world as a faculty member at eight different universities including Associate Professor at Murdoch University and Director of Studies in Veterinary Science at Cambridge University. He has over 100 prestigious research papers published, and enjoys an outstanding international reputation in the fields of animal and veterinary science.


Check out our eBooks

BirdsIdeal for Ornithology students or the budding bird enthusiast, this ebook offers an ideal foundation on birds. Learn to identify birds from around the world with over 130 colour photographs and 117 pages of fascinating bird facts.
Event ManagementThe Event Management ebook can be used as a reference for students or as a foundation text for professionals who need to know the finer details for organising an event. This book takes the reader through the all of the considerations that need to be looked at prior to, during and after an event is organised. The topics covered in the Event Management ebook are 1/ Scope and Nature of Event Management, 2/ Developing a Concept and Planning, 3/ Organising the Resources Required, 4/ Catering: Food and Drink, 5/ Promoting an Event, 6/ Managing the Clientele, 7/ Risk Management, Legalities and Contingency Planning, 8/ Delivering the Event, 9/ Organising Celebrations and Parties, 10/ Organising Exhibitions, 11/ Organising Conferences and Seminars and 12/ Working in the Event Industry.
Professional WritingProfessional writing is any writing that you are being paid for. It can include fiction writing, a best-selling book, articles in a magazine, articles in a newspaper, blogs for companies, technical manuals or procedure manuals, copy for catalogues, newsletters, text books and other academic material and so on.
Working with AnimalsIf you enjoy interacting with animals, are interested in biological science, or are passionate about wildlife, pets or farming; you may thrive in the type of jobs outlined in this book. Get to know more about the industries and the occupations that you could do. The Working with Animals ebook is a comprehensive catalogue to inspire you in your career in working with animals!