Need Assistance? 01384 442752 (UK)

PROFICIENCY AWARD IN PSYCHOLOGY VPS001

Duration (approx) 500 hours
Qualification Proficiency Award

Specialise in Psychology with this course!

The Proficiency Award is a specialised qualification that enables YOU to choose the area of psychology you want to specialise in.
 
  • Choose the area of psychology you are interested in by studying three modules focussed on your area of interest.
  • Focus on Counselling or Child Psychology or Biopsychology or choose from our wide range of psychology modules.
  • Then complete a 200 hour industry project/workbased project to learn more.
  • Approval of course structure must be obtained before enrolling.

Courses can be started anytime from anywhere in the world!

towergatelogo.jpg PROFESSIONAL LIABILITY INSURANCE FOR ACS GRADUATES
Towergate Insurance welcomes Professional Liability insurance applications from ACS graduates across all disciplines. Click here for more details.
 

It's easy to enrol...

1
Select a payment plan:  


2
Select a learning method  

3
  • The Proficiency Award enables you to focus on the area of psychology that interests YOU.
  • That might be child psychology, life coaching, educational psychology, biopsychology or any of the courses we offer.
  • YOU choose what you want to focus on to suit YOUR needs and YOUR interests!
  • A great course to increase your knowledge of a particular field in psychology for interest or to improve your job prospects.

How does it work?

You choose three modules from the list of 100 hour modules listed here.
These include - Abnormal Psychology, Life Coaching, Anger Management, Aged Care and Counselling, Managing Mental Health in Adults, Child Psychology, Adolescent Psychology and many more.
You then complete a 200 hour work based project.

Some Examples of Three Module Choices  (300 hours)

Examples of subject combinations which may be approved could be:

Any other sensible combinations may be approved. You must contact us with your module choices BEFORE enrolling to ensure that they are suitable combinations. Our psychology tutors are happy to work with you and your requirements to find the most suitable course for you. 

WORKPLACE PROJECTS (200 hours)

You next must complete a Workplace Project or work experience (approved by a tutor and equal to 200 hours duration) There are four options available to you to satisfy the Workplace Project Requirement requirement:

 

Alternative 1.

If you work in the industry that you have been studying; you may submit a reference from your employer, in an effort to satisfy this industry (ie. workplace project) requirement; on the basis of RPL (ie. recognition for prior learning), achieved through your current and past work experience.

The reference must indicate that you have skills and an awareness of your industry, which is sufficient for you to work in a position of responsibility.

Alternative 2.

A one module credit (100 hrs) can be achieved by verifying attendance at a series of industry meetings, as follows:

· Meetings may be seminars, conferences, trade shows, committee meetings, volunteer events (eg. Community working bees), or any other meeting where two or more industry people or people who are knowledgeable about their discipline.

· Opportunity must exist for the student to learn through networking, observation and/or interaction with people who know their industry or discipline

· A list of events should be submitted together with dates of each attended and times being claimed for each

· Documentary evidence must be submitted to the school to indicate support each item on the above list (eg. Receipts from seminars, conference or shows, letters from committee or organisation secretaries or committee members. All such documentation must contain a contact details)

Alternative 3.

Credits can be achieved by completing standard modules Workshop I, II and/or III

Each of these modules comprises a series of “hands on” PBL projects, designed as learning experiences that involve interaction with the real world. (This approach is based upon tried and proven learning approaches that originated in American universities but are now widely used and respected by academia throughout many countries). See the web site or handbook for more detail.

Alternative 4.

If you do not work in the relevant industry, you may choose to undertake a project as follows.

 

Procedure for a Workplace Project

This project is a major part of the course involving the number of hours relevant to the course (see above). Although the course does not contain mandatory work requirements, work experience is seen as highly desirable.

This project is based on applications in the work place and specifically aims to provide the student with the opportunity to apply and integrate skills and knowledge developed through various areas of formal study.

Students will design this project in consultation with a tutor to involve industry based activities in the area of specialized study which they select to follow in the course. The project outcomes may take the form of a written report, folio, visuals or a mixture of forms. Participants with relevant, current or past work experience will be given exemption from this project if they can provide suitable references from employers that show they have already fulfilled the requirements of this project.

For courses that involve more than 100 hours, more than one workplace project topic may be selected. For example, 200 hours may be split into two projects each of 100 hours. This will offer the student better scope to fulfill the needs of their course and to meet the number of hours required. Alternatively, the student may wish to do one large project with a duration of 200 hours.

Students will be assessed on how well they achieve the goals and outcomes they originally set as part of their negotiations with their tutor. During each 100 hours of the project, the students will present three short progress reports. These progress reports will be taken into account when evaluating the final submission. The tutor must be satisfied that the work submitted is original.

If the student wishes to do one large 200 hour report, then only three progressive reports will be needed (however the length of each report will be longer).

 

HOW TO PROCEED

1. Students are expected to select a suitable project or task to complete that allows the student to apply and integrate the knowledge and skills they have obtained as part of their studies.

2. The student should submit a draft proposal outlining their proposed project, study or task. The expected outcomes of this project should be clearly stated. This will be looked at by a tutor and comments made. Students are welcome to visit the school or to talk to a tutor to obtain advice on how to draw up their proposal. The proposal should indicate what the student intends to do, how they intend to do it, where they intend to do it, and what they expect to produce (e.g. a written report, a folio, references from an employer) as a means of showing what they have achieved during their project/study/task.

3. A refined proposal will be submitted by the student incorporating changes based on the comments made by the tutor. This updated proposal will either be accepted as being suitable or further comments made. The proposal may need to be submitted several times before it is finally accepted.

4. The student will then be expected to carry out the project, study or task.

 

Progress Reports

The student will be expected to submit three progress reports during the duration of the progress. This is in addition to the final project product (e.g. report, folio). Each progress report should show what you have done so far (e.g. what research you have done, what tasks you have carried out, etc.). It should also cover any problems you have had so far, and if so, what you have done to overcome these problems. Each progress report should be in the vicinity of 300 - 500 words in length.

Progress Report 1.

This should be submitted about one quarter of the way through your study/project/task.

Progress Report 2.

This should be submitted about one half way through your study/project/task.

Progress Report 3.

This should be submitted about three quarters of the way through your study/project/task.

 

Final Report

This report is to be typed and submitted to the school.

The final report should summarise the objective of the workplace project, and be set out like a professional report.

Although content is the most important factor in determining a pass grade for the workplace project, your report should exhibit elements of professional report writing (in regards to spelling, grammar, clarity and presentation).

 

Final Report Length

For 100 hours Workplace Projects:

* this report should be about 1,500 to 3,000 words.

For a 200 hour Workplace Project:

* this report should be about 3,000 to 5,000 words.

If you have any questions, please get in touch on 0800 328 4723 or click on the link below -

What do our students think of our courses?   " I have never found the staff at any other learning institution as supportive as the staff at ACS. This gives one a lot of peace of mind and confidence to go on - at every squeak from my side, you guys have always been there, immediately to sort me out. The feedback on my lessons has always been really good and meaningful and an important source of my learning. Thanks!..."
- Student with ACS
 
 
 

 

 

 

WHAT NEXT?

Register to Study - Go to “It’s Easy to Enrol” box at the top of the page and you can enrol now.

or

Get Advice –  Email us at info@acsedu.co.uk  OR

Use our FREE COUNSELLING SERVICE to contact a tutor

CLICK TO CONTACT US

 

 

 

Meet some of our academics

Tracey Jones (psychology)B.Sc. (Hons) (Psychology), M.Soc.Sc (social work), DipSW (social work), PGCE (Education), PGD (Learning Disability Studies) Tracey began studying psychology in 1990. She has a wide range of experience within the psychology and social work field, particularly working with people with learning disabilities. She is also qualified as a teacher and now teaches psychology and social work related subjects. She has been a book reviewer for the British Journal of Social Work and has also written many textbooks, blogs, articles and ebooks on psychology, writing, sociology, child development and more. She has had also several short stories published.
Lyn Quirk M.Ed.,Dip.Med.,Dip.SportsOver 35 years as Health Club Manager, Fitness Professional, Teacher, Coach and Business manager in health, fitness and leisure industries. As business owner and former department head for TAFE, she brings a wealth of skills and experience to her role as a tutor for ACS.M.Prof.Ed.; Adv.Dip.Compl.Med (Naturopathy); Adv.Dip.Sports Therapy
Kate Gibson B.Soc.Sc.15+ years experience in HR, marketing, education & project management. Kate has traveled and worked in a variety of locations including London, New Zealand and Australia.
Gavin Cole B.Sc.,M.Psych.Psychologist, Educator, Author, Psychotherapist. B.Sc., Psych.Cert., M. Psych. Cert.Garden Design, MACA Gavin has over 25 years of experience in psychology, in both Australia and England. He has co-authored several psychology text books and many courses including diploma and degree level courses in psychology and counselling. Gavin joined ACS in 2001.


Check out our eBooks

Animal PsychologyExplore how animals think and comare how this differs between different animals (and humans)
Psychology DictionaryThis book provides explanations for common terms used in Psychology.
Counselling HandbookA book for both students, as well as volunteers who may be involved in helping people with problems. This is a starting point for understanding counselling, and a reference for developing counselling skills. The book contains seven chapters: 1. Where can counselling be used 2. How to see behind the mask 3. Emotions and attitudes 4. How to communicate better when all you have is words 5. Theory versus practice 6. Diffusing difficult situations 7. Golden rules or tips
How Children ThinkAnyone who has ever tried to make a child do anything (clean up their mess, desist from throwing mud, stop drawing on the walls) knows that children think differently to adults. This book attempts to provide the skills and knowledge to develop a greater understanding of children.