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FOUNDATION DIPLOMA IN APPLIED BOTANY VSC016

Duration (approx) 1000 hours
Qualification Foundation Diploma

 

The world needs Experts in Botany

Botanical science is very important for horticultural agricultural and environmental industries. Our knowledge of plants allows us to produce much of the world's food, building materials, fibre, and even fuel; mot to mention maintaining stability in the environment. 

Like many areas of science, opportunities in botany have been changing. The growth area for opportunities is in the world of commerce. 

Businesses, big and small are finding more and more ways of making money from plants; and those businesses need more and more people who understand plant science.


 

 

 

 



Courses can be started anytime from anywhere in the world!

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Businesses, big and small are finding more and more ways of making money from plants

 

  • Business needs more and more people who understand plant science.
  • Learning about plant physiology and anatomy is the starting point.
  • If you also understand plant chemistry, and ecology, you have knowledge that will give you a jump start in any business or job that involves plants.

 

Botanical science is very important for horticultural agricultural and environmental industries. Our knowledge of plants allows us to produce much of the worlds food, building materials, fibre, and even fuel; mot to mention maintaining stability in the environment. 


COURSE STRUCTURE
The Foundation Diploma in Applied Botany comprises 10 modules, as shown below. Please click on each module title for further details.

  1. Botany I - Plant Physiology And Taxonomy BSC104
  2. Plant Ecology BSC305
  3. Biochemistry I (Plants) BSC102
  4. Horticulture I BHT101
  5. Botany II - Applied Plant Physiology BSC204
  6. Biochemistry II BSC203
  7. Genetics BSC207
  8. Plant Breeding BHT236
  9. Research Project I BGN102
  10. 100 Hour Industry Project (see details, below)
 

Course Duration: Approximately 1,000 hours of self paced studies.

Industry (Workplace) Projects

There are 4 options available to you to satisfy this requirement:

Alternative 1
If you work in the industry that you have been studying; you may submit a reference from your employer, in an effort to satisfy this industry (ie. workplace project) requirement; on the basis of RPL (ie. recognition for prior learning), achieved through your current and past work experience.

The reference must indicate that you have skills and an awareness of your industry, which is sufficient for you to work in a position of responsibility.

Alternative 2
A one module credit (100 hrs) can be achieved by verifying attendance at a series of industry meetings, as follows:

  • Meetings may be seminars, conferences, trade shows, committee meetings, volunteer events (eg. Community working bees), or any other meeting where two or more industry people or people who are knowledgeable about their discipline.

  • Opportunity must exist for the student to learn through networking, observation and/or interaction with people who know their industry or discipline

  • A list of events should be submitted together with dates of each attended and times being claimed for each 

  • Documentary evidence must be submitted to the school to indicate support each item on the above list (eg. Receipts from seminars, conference or shows, letters from committee or organisation secretaries or committee members. All such documentation must contain contact details).


Alternative 3
Credits can be achieved by completing standard modules Workshop I, II and/or III.

Each of these modules comprises a series of “hands on” PBL projects, designed as learning experiences that involve interaction with the real world. (This approach is based upon tried and proven learning approaches that originated in American universities but are now widely used and respected by academia throughout many countries). See the web site or handbook for more detail.

Example:

Workshop I
There are 3 lessons, each involving a PBL project, as follows: 

  1. Workplace Tools, Equipment and Materials: Identifying and describing the operation of tools and equipment used in the workplace; routine maintenance of tools and equipment; identifying and comparing materials used in the workplace; using different materials to perform workplace tasks. 

  2. Workplace Skills: Determining key practical skills in the workplace; identifying and comparing commonly-performed workplace tasks; determining acceptable standards for workplace tasks; implementing techniques for improving workplace efficiency. 

  3. Workplace Safety: Identifying health and safety risks in the workplace; complying with industry OH&S standards; developing safety guidelines for handling dangerous items. 

  4. What is PBL? Problem-based learning has been defined as: “A learning method based on using problems as a starting point for acquisition and integration of new knowledge.”



Alternative 4
If you do not work in the relevant industry, you need to undertake a project as follows. 

Procedure for a Workplace Project
This project is a major part of the course involving the number of hours relevant to the course (see above). Although the course does not contain mandatory work requirements, work experience is seen as highly desirable. 

This project is based on applications in the work place and specifically aims to provide the student with the opportunity to apply and integrate skills and knowledge developed through various areas of formal study.

Students will design this project in consultation with a tutor to involve industry based activities in the area of specialized study which they select to follow in the course. The project outcomes may take the form of a written report, folio, visuals or a mixture of forms. Participants with relevant, current or past work experience will be given exemption from this project if they can provide suitable references from employers that show they have already fulfilled the requirements of this project.

Students will be assessed on how well they achieve the goals and outcomes they originally set as part of their negotiations with their tutor. During each 100 hours of the project, the students will present three short progress reports. These progress reports will be taken into account when evaluating the final submission. The tutor must be satisfied that the work submitted is original.

HOW TO PROCEED

  1. Students are expected to select a suitable project or task to complete that allows the student to apply and integrate the knowledge and skills they have obtained as part of their studies.

  2. The student should submit a draft proposal outlining their proposed project, study or task. The expected outcomes of this project should be clearly stated. This will be looked at by a tutor and comments made. Students are welcome to visit the school or to talk to a tutor to obtain advice on how to draw up their proposal. The proposal should indicate what the student intends to do, how they intend to do it, where they intend to do it, and what they expect to produce (e.g. a written report, a folio, references from an employer) as a means of showing what they have achieved during their project/study/task.

  3. A refined proposal will be submitted by the student incorporating changes based on the comments made by the tutor. This updated proposal will either be accepted as being suitable or further comments made. The proposal may need to be submitted several times before it is finally accepted. 

  4. The student will then be expected to carry out the project, study or task.



Progress Reports
The student will be expected to submit three progress reports during the duration of the progress. This is in addition to the final project product (e.g. report, folio). Each progress report should show what you have done so far (e.g. what research you have done, what tasks you have carried out, etc.). It should also cover any problems you have had so far, and if so, what you have done to overcome these problems. Each progress report should be in the region of 300 - 500 words in length.

Progress Report 1
This should be submitted about one quarter of the way through your study/project/task.

Progress Report 2
This should be submitted about one half way through your study/project/task.

Progress Report 3
This should be submitted about three quarters of the way through your study/project/task.

Final Report
This report is to be typed and submitted to the School.

The final report should summarise the objective of the workplace project, and be set out like a professional report.

Although content is the most important factor in determining a pass grade for the workplace project, your report should exhibit elements of professional report writing (in regards to spelling, grammar, clarity and presentation).

Final Report Length
For 100 hours Workplace Projects:  Complete and submit a report of 1,500 to 3,000 words.

 

 

 

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Meet some of our academics

Timothy WalkerB.A.(Botany), RHS.M. Hort., Post.Grad.Dip.Ed. Former Director, Oxford Botanic Gardens.
Bob James (Environmental)Bob has a unique set of qualifications and experience having worked in applied biological and environmental sciences for more than 50 years. He holds a string of tertiary qualifications in animal, plant and environmental sciences; including a Masters Degree in Environmental Science. He has worked as a tutor with ACS since 1995. Bob has worked as a teacher, research scientist and consultant for both government and private enterprise undertaking jobs ranging from environmental surveys to waste disposal.
Dr Lynette Morgan (Horticulture)Lyn worked with Rivendell Mushroom Farm between 1986 and 88; and then as a research assistant and technician for a few years while undertaking university studies. In 1991 she graduated from Massey University with a Bachelor of Horticultural Science (Hons) which covered broad horticultural sciences, as well as nursery vegetable and fruit production. Throughout the 90's she worked in both the nursery industry and horticultural crop production, before establishing her own business "Suntec" which has built an exceptional international reputation providing consulting services; particularly in hydroponic crop production. Dr Morgan has a broad expertise in horticulture and crop production, and a keen appreciation of the global scene. She travels widely as a partner in Suntec Horticultural Consultants, and has clients in central America, the USA, Caribbean, South East Asia, the Middle East, Australia and New Zealand.


Check out our eBooks

Growing & Knowing GrassesThe Growing & Knowing Grasses ebook will provide you with everything that you need to know about grass. Get to all about the botany of grasses, how to identify them, how to cultivate grasses, the different uses for grasses and also includes a detailed illustrated encyclopedia of grasses and grass-like plants.
Plant LanguageAn essential companion for any horticulture enthusiast, professional or student, this ebook will help you pronounce and understand plant names.
Medicinal HerbsThe Medicinal Herbs ebook is a practical guide for anyone who is interested in using herbs for medicinal purposes. This ebook is a fascinating read that looks into the chemicals in herbs and their effects on the body. Illustrations and descriptions included in this help you identify the plants effectively.
Commercial HydroponicsThe Commercial Hydroponics ebook is ideal for students, professional horticulturalists and those who want to build a strong foundation knowledge in hydroponics. The commercial hydroponics ebook explains how to set up a commercial hydroponics system, including growing techniques and equipment that you will need. The topics covered in this book include an introduction to hydroponics, site considerations, alternatives, plant nutrition, nutrient film technique culture, rockwool culture, aggregate culture, other techniques, hydroponics equipment, greenhouse operation, plant culture in hydroponics, Vegetable crops, berry and other fruit crops, flower crops, other crops, managing a commercial hydroponic farm and a troubleshooting guide.